Birder's Guide

JAN 2019

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/1072320

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embracing an overall experience. In a kaleidoscope of weather, seasons, scen- ery, wildlife, history, epic moments, in- stant memories, and shared stories, no two days are alike. Polar voyagers tend to have a lot in common even if they're not birders; they are curious, respectful, resourceful, willing to learn. And after going to the end of the Earth, they return home inspired, often becoming lifelong ambassadors for the natural wonders of Antarctica. The ABA is Going to Antarctica! For ABA members and friends, the ABA—partnered with Rockjumper Birding Adventures— has chartered a special 19-day "Classic Antarctica" voyage October 31–November 19, 2020 aboard the Russian vessel Akademik Ioffe . This trip offers passengers close encounters with Antarctic wildlife, including penguins, skuas, petrels, sheathbills, seals, and whales—all backdropped by scenes of stark beauty—while supporting the ABA and traveling with a fun group of friends. The lead guide will be George Armistead, chief network officer at Rockjumper Birding Tours, who has a long history of connecting people with nature through the ABA. This early season voyage is well timed to show off pelagic birds in fine feather, and the route is designed to feature the Falkland Islands and rugged South Georgia Island in addition to the Antarctic Penin - sula, with the chance to see Emperor Penguins. Departing from Ushuaia, Argentina, the voyage costs $14,300–$23,500 per person. For details, see aba.org/aba-antarctica-charter Birding Antarctica 30 Birder's Guide to Travel | January 2019 left : n The achingly white Snow Petrel, known as the "Angel of the Antarctic", haunts large icebergs and pack ice. Photo © Noah Strycker below : n Unlike their more colorful parents, young King Penguins are disguised by woolly brown down. Photo © Rich Lindie/www.rockjumperbirding.com

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