Birder's Guide

OCT 2014

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/392347

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 41 of 57

34 Birder's Guide to Listing & Taxonomy | October 2014 Aplomado Falcons in the ABA Area A 2 0 1 4 S t A t u S R e p o R t mid the rightly prominent public atten- tion given to Peregrine Falcon conserva- tion, a large-scale but less widely known project is focusing on the Peregrine's close relative, the Aplomado Falcon. The goal is restoration of the Aplomado to its former breeding range in the U.S., where its subspecies septentrionalis is offcial- ly listed as endangered. This beautiful falcon is res- ident throughout much of South America, Central America, and Mexico. Its northernmost natural range limits traditionally reached the U.S. along the coastal savannas of southern Texas and across the Chihuahuan Desert in southeastern Arizona, southern New Mexico, and western Texas. It was once fairly common in those northern- most regions, at least locally, but populations gradually dwindled during the past century, until the last reports of nesting in the U.S. came in the 1940s and early 1950s. An exciting resumption of successful breeding occurred in 2002 in southwestern New Mexico, where a resident pair fedged three young after a decade of wild Aplomados being present in that area. In his regional nesting season sum- mary in North American Birds (56:468), Sartor O. Williams III hailed the oc- Editor's NotE: the ABA's recording standards and Ethics Committee just passed a change to its recording rules that allows birders to unequivocally count Aplomado Falcons seen in coastal texas on lists reported to the ABA (see p. 47 for details), regardless of whether those populations are established. Certainly, there's much more to know about the conservation and repatriation ef- forts of these fascinating birds than whether you can check the box next to their name. read on! A Editor's NotE: the ABA's recording standards and Ethics Committee just passed a change to its recording rules that allows birders to unequivocally count Aplomado Falcons seen in coastal texas on lists reported to the ABA (see p. 47 for details), regardless of whether those populations are established. Certainly, there's much more to know about the conservation and repatriation ef- forts of these fascinating birds than whether you can check the box next to their name. read on!

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of Birder's Guide - OCT 2014