Birder's Guide

MAY 2017

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/826890

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mysterious tone, as if whispering a secret softly hid- of this tiny yet mighty Hawaiian honeycreeper, whose Continued life for most endemic Hawaiian for- demics face more pressure than the Maui Parrotbill, on Maui. 'a - such as pigs and deer. From 1945–1995, feral pigs tion, and facilitated the spread of disease-carrying hi'a trees. Rare are actual sightings and mosquito-borne diseases. But few of these en- bark and wood from small trees and shrubs such as about by alien species, particularly feral ungulates den among the 'o An impressive, powerful beak helps the parrotbill igh above homes and beyond the sounds of invaded Haleakala brilliant yellow eyebrow matches its tail and belly - dangers, such as invasive species, habitat destruction, find its food. Small insects are found by removing Today, Maui Parrotbills face challenges brought by a stiff, cool breeze. The whistles share a xanthophrys the most critically endangered forest bird , caused chronic habitat degrada- hi'a lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha). - feathers. This is the story of the Kiwikiu, a small and kala (Rubus hawaiensis), kanawao (Broussaisia argu- mighty bird—a tale of resilience and adaptation. est birds requires resistance to a variety of artificial Birder's Guide to Conservation & Community | May 2017 38 H society, a series of short whistles is fanned - also known as the Kiwikiu. There are only about 500 ta), and 'o of the little yellow birds left, making Pseudonestor of the little yellow birds left, making Pseudonestor ta), and 'o also known as the Kiwikiu. There are only about 500 - society, a series of short whistles is fanned est birds requires resistance to a variety of artificial mighty bird—a tale of resilience and adaptation. kala (Rubus hawaiensis), kanawao (Broussaisia argu- feathers. This is the story of the Kiwikiu, a small and - hi'a lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha). , caused chronic habitat degrada- xanthophrys the most critically endangered forest bird by a stiff, cool breeze. The whistles share a Today, Maui Parrotbills face challenges brought find its food. Small insects are found by removing dangers, such as invasive species, habitat destruction, - brilliant yellow eyebrow matches its tail and belly invaded Haleakala igh above homes and beyond the sounds of An impressive, powerful beak helps the parrotbill den among the 'o about by alien species, particularly feral ungulates bark and wood from small trees and shrubs such as and mosquito-borne diseases. But few of these en- hi'a trees. Rare are actual sightings tion, and facilitated the spread of disease-carrying such as pigs and deer. From 1945–1995, feral pigs - 'a on Maui. demics face more pressure than the Maui Parrotbill, Continued life for most endemic Hawaiian for- of this tiny yet mighty Hawaiian honeycreeper, whose mysterious tone, as if whispering a secret softly hid- Kiwikiu A Story of Survival and Adaptation from Maui

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