Birder's Guide

OCT 2017

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/880901

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15 October 2017 | Birder's Guide to Listing & Taxonomy station, I dined and headed out one last time in hopes of wringing out a fi- nal few birds. A Scissor-tailed Nightjar, which was a continuing first record for the station, could always be found in the airstrip, and tonight was no exception. Two other species cried into the night—a Great Potoo, and my final new species of the day, a Spectacled Owl. At this point, there wasn't much left to hope for, so I called it quits at 11 p.m. Perplexingly, my body did not feel a hint of exhaustion. My mind was still rac - ing, ready to spring for the next sound. Flurries of calls from earlier in the day whizzed around my head at 100 mph. Phantom voices of Rusty-fronted Tody- Flycatcher and Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin called late into the night… but wait! Those are strictly diurnal species. I knew in reality these species were not actually present, and I was experiencing the odd ghost bird effect that plagues birders at the end of Big Days. The all-consuming devotion of my mind and body to find - ing birds for the previous 19 hours was beginning to catch up with my physical limitations. By midnight, I made the final tally on my computer's spreadsheet. After a full- on 19 hours and 11 miles, I had logged 345 species! My heart leapt with great surprise when I saw that number. In bizarre in having "hand" claws and the ability to swim. Photo © Sean Williams stink-turkeys—otherwise known as Hoatzins—nervously snort, spread their wings, and tip forward when people get too close. The young are equally n At stagnant bodies of water, the folivorous (leaf-eating), Suess-like, n At stagnant bodies of water, the folivorous (leaf-eating), Suess-like, wings, and tip forward when people get too close. The young are equally stink-turkeys—otherwise known as Hoatzins—nervously snort, spread their Photo © Sean Williams bizarre in having "hand" claws and the ability to swim.

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