Birder's Guide

MAR 2018

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/979790

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Introducing Tadoussac 46 Birder's Guide to Travel | April 2018 Americas. Despite its venerable age, the village has re- tation for whale watching. It's probably the only location in at the head of the marine estuary of the St. Lawrence River. It's ing majority of Francophones, English-speaking visitors are Since 1993, L'Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac (Tadoussac lowing a cold front. The program rapidly revealed out-of-this- ously inhabited French-established settlement in the Tadoussac is located at the mouth of the Saguenay River and August to the end of November. Its first goal was to monitor part of La Haute-Côte-Nord County, Québec's county with the warmly welcomed and will be able to receive service in English - But with more than 300,000 visitors per year, Tadoussac is one highest bird list (341 species), including many boreal special- gram that includes daily visual counts spanning the end of startled founding team to establish a permanent and rigorous ties and vagrants. Despite being a region with an overwhelm- world diurnal flights of different boreal species, prompting the Bird Observatory) has implemented a migration survey pro- the world readily reached by road where beluga whales can be easily observed. raptor migration, which can be quite impressive on days fol Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac (OOT) ounded in 1600, Tadoussac is the oldest continu pretty much anywhere. mained small, with only 850 permanent inhabitants currently. of the top destinations in Québec, mainly because of its repu- - Boreal Owl movements, with a record high number of over Dickcissel, Clay-colored Sparrow, and Lark Sparrow are regu- epitome of them, from the perspective of an easterner, is prob- up more or less regularly, with presences of Prairie Warbler, remains largely unknown to most birders. Massive movements is occasionally host to a unique phenomenon of reverse migra- night. About once every four years, the observatory witnesses Grosbeak have all been recurrent vagrants in Tadoussac. The L'Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac, its potential in spring est. A banding station is also active during the fall season, tar- White-eyed Vireo, Blue Grosbeak, but also of Cave Swallows, 200 captures in 2004. ably the Hermit Warbler that delighted a bunch of excited ob- sample of high counts of certain species exiting the boreal for- dor has produced a good volume of vagrants, usually from servers on 29 October 2013 before getting caught in a mist although they tend to be less predictable. During the month of the western part of the continent, in the past two decades. May, the immediate coast of the north shore of the St. Lawrence tion, in which up to tens of thousands of warblers will correct While fall may indeed be the best time of the year to visit The daily presence of skilled birders in a migration corri- Franklin's Gull, Townsend's Solitaire, and even Black-headed their trajectory, flying northeast to southwest, sometimes all lar here, but rarer species such as Swainson's Hawk, Mew Gull, count of all visible migration. Table 1 (on page 49) shows a and more astonishingly, one Gray Kingbird (again in 2013). of a magnitude surpassing that known in the fall can occur, net. Although not as regular, southern vagrants have popped geting boreal songbirds during the day and Aegolius owls at - of the top destinations in Québec, mainly because of its repu- the world readily reached by road where beluga whales can be Bird Observatory) has implemented a migration survey pro- world diurnal flights of different boreal species, prompting the ties and vagrants. Despite being a region with an overwhelm- startled founding team to establish a permanent and rigorous gram that includes daily visual counts spanning the end of highest bird list (341 species), including many boreal special- But with more than 300,000 visitors per year, Tadoussac is one - warmly welcomed and will be able to receive service in English part of La Haute-Côte-Nord County, Québec's county with the August to the end of November. Its first goal was to monitor Tadoussac is located at the mouth of the Saguenay River and ously inhabited French-established settlement in the lowing a cold front. The program rapidly revealed out-of-this- Since 1993, L'Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac (Tadoussac ing majority of Francophones, English-speaking visitors are at the head of the marine estuary of the St. Lawrence River. It's tation for whale watching. It's probably the only location in Americas. Despite its venerable age, the village has re- geting boreal songbirds during the day and Aegolius owls at net. Although not as regular, southern vagrants have popped of a magnitude surpassing that known in the fall can occur, and more astonishingly, one Gray Kingbird (again in 2013). count of all visible migration. Table 1 (on page 49) shows a lar here, but rarer species such as Swainson's Hawk, Mew Gull, their trajectory, flying northeast to southwest, sometimes all Franklin's Gull, Townsend's Solitaire, and even Black-headed The daily presence of skilled birders in a migration corri- While fall may indeed be the best time of the year to visit tion, in which up to tens of thousands of warblers will correct May, the immediate coast of the north shore of the St. Lawrence the western part of the continent, in the past two decades. although they tend to be less predictable. During the month of servers on 29 October 2013 before getting caught in a mist dor has produced a good volume of vagrants, usually from easily observed. raptor migration, which can be quite impressive on days fol Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac (OOT) ounded in 1600, Tadoussac is the oldest continu pretty much anywhere. mained small, with only 850 permanent inhabitants currently. sample of high counts of certain species exiting the boreal for- ably the Hermit Warbler that delighted a bunch of excited ob- 200 captures in 2004. White-eyed Vireo, Blue Grosbeak, but also of Cave Swallows, est. A banding station is also active during the fall season, tar- L'Observatoire d'Oiseaux de Tadoussac, its potential in spring Grosbeak have all been recurrent vagrants in Tadoussac. The night. About once every four years, the observatory witnesses is occasionally host to a unique phenomenon of reverse migra- remains largely unknown to most birders. Massive movements up more or less regularly, with presences of Prairie Warbler, epitome of them, from the perspective of an easterner, is prob- Dickcissel, Clay-colored Sparrow, and Lark Sparrow are regu- Boreal Owl movements, with a record high number of over F A HIDDEN GEM OF THE NORTHEAST n Haut-fond Prince Lighthouse. Photo © Patrice Morreale

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