Birder's Guide

MAR 2018

Birder's Guide is the American Birding Association's newest publication. Each issue focuses on a key subject, providing tips from experienced birders on a wide variety of topics like Travel, Listing & Taxonomy, Gear, and Conservation & Community.

Issue link: http://bg.aba.org/i/979790

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North American in character, but rather between the two great continental plates Birding in Iceland is no less spectacu- seem as easy to find as harriers are on pay attention. It is said that, during the a place absolutely and quite its own, lar than the country itself, especially in breeding season, the Atlantic Puffins forgettable. Its position along the gap into a magically unique place. strongly independent and entirely un- summer. In the warm months, it be- is also what gives the island its volcanic comes a place where Parasitic Jaegers punch and what shapes the landscape 61 April 2018 | Birder's Guide to Travel Moon Township, Pennsylvania pomarine@earthlink.net Geoff Malosh this nation is nonetheless not often at scenic places on Earth, like a miniature North America and Europe. The Mid- front of mind for most international Atlantic Ridge runs through the center tween the North American and Eurasian Famous for its rugged beauty, es that defies all superlatives. accessible, with less ice and more volca- celand is one of those rare plac- I But it should be. It is one of the most noes. Iceland sits literally right between tourists, birders and non-birders alike. Antarctica of the north, only far, far more a drive through the Dakota plains—in the Ring Road every five minutes if you some areas, you might find one along ly European or of the country, splitting the island be- European in name try may be considered tectonic plates. The coun- yet it manages to be neither entire- be neither entire- yet it manages to tectonic plates. The coun- try may be considered European in name of the country, splitting the island be- ly European or Antarctica of the north, only far, far more tourists, birders and non-birders alike. noes. Iceland sits literally right between But it should be. It is one of the most celand is one of those rare plac- accessible, with less ice and more volca- es that defies all superlatives. Famous for its rugged beauty, tween the North American and Eurasian Atlantic Ridge runs through the center front of mind for most international North America and Europe. The Mid- scenic places on Earth, like a miniature this nation is nonetheless not often at in Iceland outnumber humans three to one. Sometimes it seems like you can't get out of your car you can't get out of your car to one. Sometimes it seems like in Iceland outnumber humans three some areas, you might find one along the Ring Road every five minutes if you a drive through the Dakota plains—in punch and what shapes the landscape comes a place where Parasitic Jaegers is also what gives the island its volcanic summer. In the warm months, it be- strongly independent and entirely un- into a magically unique place. forgettable. Its position along the gap breeding season, the Atlantic Puffins lar than the country itself, especially in a place absolutely and quite its own, pay attention. It is said that, during the seem as easy to find as harriers are on Birding in Iceland is no less spectacu- between the two great continental plates North American in character, but rather

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